Earning the Title

Many of you have been impatiently waiting for an update, and after much frustration on our end with the technical difficulties, we’re finally able to post again!

At this point your recruits have become Marines and those long 13 weeks have finally passed. It’s without a doubt they receded back to when they were babies and did nothing but eat, sleep and poop the entire time they were home on leave. But can you blame them? It was much deserved after what they had to endure to earn that Eagle, Globe and Anchor.

 

There is no better feeling in the world than when that EGA is placed into the palm of your hand. It’s the first moment you face your drill instructors as “equals,” as Marines. It’s the first time they’ll ever talk to you like you’re not an imbecile. And talk about seeing a bunch of grown men cry! But I guess, given the circumstances, it was acceptable. The thing that made their particular EGA ceremony unique was that it was actually held on the Marine Corps’ birthday. There’s no better date to earn the title Marine. And to make it even more glorious a day, several original Montford Point Marines were there to witness.

 

The second best feeling in the world, or at least at that moment in time, is being able to shower for the first time in days and make your way into the mess hall for the Warriors Breakfast. No more monitoring what you eating, whether you’re normally a double rats or diet recruit, but just eating, eating and eating everything in sight. They grab mountains of pancakes, piles of bacon, loaves of bread and bowls overflowing with ice cream. If you imagine a pack of hyenas preying on a single antelope, that’s what these boys looked like trying to inhale their food and get up there for seconds before it all was gone. Most of them eat so much their stomach begins to hurt but they still keep eating. Disgusting as it sounds, several probably take trips to the head just so they can finish their plates!

 

Their final week of recruit training is called Marine Week, for obvious reasons. They spend countless hours preparing for the Battalion Commanders Inspection and graduation. It’s not unusual for the drill instructors to go back to treating them like Week 1 recruits as punishment because of their big heads though. They think that because they’re Marines now they can act all crazy, but in order for everything to go smoothly for graduation, that discipline they learned throughout recruit training is still necessary.

 

This is also the week they get seen by medical for any injuries they may have gotten while on the crucible. The main difference now is they’re not worried about being kicked back in recruit training or held from graduation because they can see the light at the end of the tunnel. They know they’ve earned the title and within a matter of days they’ll be able to see their family again and walk across that parade deck for the last time.

 

It was probably a very proud day for every parent out there to see that ill-mannered, lazy child of theirs ultimately reborn. I can guarantee they didn’t act the same way as before they shipped for training.

 

On a more personal note, I didn’t have the best approach in telling my dad when I joined the Corps. I was going to college with a full-ride scholarship at the time. One day I walked into his office and placed one of those “Proud Parent of a United States Marine” magnets on his desk. I’m a bad child, I know. Needless to say, whatever was on his desk at the time wasn’t there for long. He was furious! But he knew I was hard-headed and once I made up my mind there was no changing it. I shipped a few months later, and much to my surprise (he hates to travel), he actually showed up to my graduation. It meant the world to me, but I still sort of felt he was just there because my mother was there and he didn’t want to look like the bad parent (they’re divorced). However, when I went home on leave, EVERY time we ran into someone, he introduced me by saying, “This is my daughter, Kristin. She’s a Marine.” I knew from that moment on that he really was proud of me for what I did.

13 weeks is only 13 weeks. It may have seemed like forever, but there may be times where you’ll go months or even years without seeing your Marine. Just remember how proud you are of them and how important their service really is. It’s because of them that you’re able to sleep under that blanket of freedom at night. Be proud of your United States Marine.

 

http://www.dvidshub.net/news/80331/recruits-become-marines-corps-celebrates-236-years

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Welcome, this is the official U.S. Marine Corps blog page for Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego (MCRDSD) where you will find the most recent information and news about the depot. It is our goal to provide the public with information and news about MCRDSD and allow for an open forum of discussion about depot topics. If you are looking for our official web page please visit http://www.marines.mil/unit/tecom/mcrdsandiego/Pages/welcome.aspx or http://www.marines.mil/ Please feel free to express your opinion about the Marine Corps in an objective and respectful way that allows for a continued information relationship. While this is an open forum, it's also intended to maintain respect for those who participate (i.e. family-friendly). Please keep your comments clean. Participants are asked to follow our posting guidelines below. Violation of the guidelines below may result in your post being removed. Posting Guidelines: We do not under any circumstance allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Lastly, the appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Marine Corps or Department of Defense.

20 thoughts on “Earning the Title

  1. Thank you, Kristin!! I, too was like your Dad, initally. I know my fear came out as anger but I’m really proud of my kid and all the Marines!! I’m still scared as a mom is but he’s tough and so am I!!

  2. Beautifully said Kristin. Thank You for being there to protect my freedom also and, thank you for your hard work on the completion of this project. My son has told me a few stories of the ceremony and all the tears. Thanks to this project, I was able to tell him that I too cried the moment I heard he had received his Eagle Globe and Anchor. I felt as though I were there with him and that I couldn’t be more proud of him than I was at that moment.

  3. Thank you Kristin for the last chapter in this journey. Its hard to believe its been a week already that we were in San Diego waiting to see our new Marine…family day and graduation will be moments that I will cherish for the rest of my life, thank you MCRD.
    Golf Co. Plt. 2149 OOORAH!

  4. First off, THANK YOU WHITNEY!!!!! You are the one who took us from day 1 to the end!!! You are the one who kept us all together as a FAMILY!! You let us all see what goes on and how these boys became men, aka-MARINES!!! You set the one who deserves all the thank you’s!!! Thank you for all your COURAGE and DETERMINATION !!!! You will always be remembered as the eyes to us sitting and waiting for our next blog or pictures!! THANK YOU WHITNEY!!!! 2149!!
    Kristen- thank you got your story.

  5. First of all, Thank you Whitney, your presense at the meet and greet was one of the best times for us all, you and the DI’s were very very impressive and showed us a human side of the Sgt.s and SDI’s and DI’s.
    I DO NOT AGREE HOWEVER WITH THE ABOVE COMMENT: about our children being lazy and ill mannered. Your idea of their being reborn is in conflict with what their idea was. They wanted to be MARINES. Did you look at their records and see they they were ill mannered and lazy? All the recruits before and After Golf Company that will become Marines or have become MARINES do not all fall into the catagory of what you claim. You think you were hard headed and whatever cause you had some full whatever ride doesn’t give you the right to say that our Marines were on the lazy and ill mannered side. Think before you type. I am sure there are plenty of offended parents out there, one for sure that did notify me of this offensive statement. I hope you do have to apologize to all of the Golf Company parents, family and friends for this rude remark that I take unkindly to.

    • That was written by Kristen, NOT Whitney!! And I fully agree with you about what she said was rude about these MEN/MARINES!!!!

  6. My son was not ill-manneres or lazy!! My son was and is polite and able to complete a task. Kristin, you do not know my son and obviously have not met him!! Your words are offensive to me and your brother in arms, a fellow MARINE!! One of the first things I learned in English 101 was not to make all inclusive statements and don’t make assumptions!! Shocking that you completed the final blog by tarnishing the integrity of my son, my only child!! WOW!! My son is willing to sacrifice his life for OUR COUNTRY AND OUR FREEDOMS!! Please dont make assumptions about my unselfish, unwavering, patriotic MARINE!! One final question, did you even see or meet the MARINES of Golf Co.? My ASSUMPTION is NO!! A public apology to the MARINES of Golf Co would be a great next blog. Sad considering this was suppose to be the last and most heartfelt blog!! Great journalism… I think NOT!!

  7. Kristen…I appreciate you finishing the blog since Sgt. Frasier was unable to. But Sgt. Frasier met our Recruits/Marines and I hardly think she would have called them ill mannered or lazy. My son has never been lazy. My husband and I have always taught our sons to have good manners and I take pride in that. I don’t think the Marine Corp would have been his choice if he was lazy.
    As I said, I appreciate your finishing this blog but I don’t think your choice of words was the best to describe the men we sent to MCRD.

  8. I do apprectiate the fact that SOME of this ending of the journey of the Marines has been posted. I do not feel that impantient is the correct wording. We have brought a child into this world, raised them properly, taught them morals, worked our a.. off to provide for them so therefore we have the internal desire to see our sons become successful in the timely manner that was told to us. Then when we do get a glimps of the ending of this journey, our sons are called ill-mannered, lazy child. I have to say these marines have to have some clue about what being a man is all about or they would never have had the desire to be a marine in the first place. With the information out there at our fingertips, you do not think that every boy researched what was about to happen to them before they ever signed up. Lazy would be the one that turns the internet off and says, “There is no way I am doing that” or they would turn the news off when the hear of someone getting killed while serving their country, “I am not dieing for people I do not know”. That is what I would call lazy, ill-mannered. Our boys had a spark in their heart to be courages and honoring to their familys and country so they joined an elite program that may cost them their lives.
    The fact is, their journey has just begun. They will go and fight for the right of you having the ability to write and call our sons ill-mannered and lazy. They may even die while doing it which is the biggest fear of us parents who raised our sons not to be lazy or ill-mannered. I do not think you meant to be condescending but maybe a poor choice of words but then again what could you have meant by lazy and ill-mannered that would not have been condescending?
    Whitney, thank you for being sensitive and tender hearted towards us parents that have just done the hardest thing we have ever done. We could have made this journey without you but it would have been just down right miserable. We love you and hope the best for your family. There are not enough words to write that will explain what you have done for us. Thank You!

  9. I was so looking forward to the final entry to ToM, that Whitney so caringly started 13 weeks ago. Was I shocked and completely taking back, that someone that (I’m assuming) never spent a minute with our Marines, could blatently call them them lazy and ill-mannered. Our Marine has always pushed himself to be the best person he can be and specifically CHOSE the Marines because he knew that they would demand that he be the BEST. He went in well mannered, respectful and very self-disciplined, as did 98% of his new brothers. I do NOT appreciate someone that has never even layed eyes on him, to insinuate that HE or ANY of these young men are anything but brave and honorable for the decision that they have made. I certainly hope that there is an apology to our new Marines and their families on the way. In the future, please remember that just because you were a hard headed child, and went in for whatever reason, most of these Marines knew from a very early age, that they wanted to serve their country. You’ve made it sound like we sent to a reform school. Very disappointed and hope that in the future, you will choose your words more wisely.

  10. Two lines made me disappointed in this blog. It is so unfortunate.
    It would have been better to say: It was a proud day for parents when theirr young man earned the title of Marine and graduated.
    Not: It was probably a very proud day for every parent out there to see that ill-mannered, lazy child of theirs ultimately reborn.
    Be careful what you write because words do hurt.

  11. The journey for these Boot Marines has just begun. Many have chosen the back-bone, heart and soul, the spine of the Corps, INFANTRY. Others will go on to their MOS in the Corps. There will be many up’s and downs in their 4 year journey. Just like life, some celebrations and some disappointments but one thing for sure. No one knows what the future holds for these Marines except what they make of it. The Marines makes no promises. The title Marine will remain with them the rest of their lives. No one said it was going to be easy, safe or confortable. The Marines exist for one reason, to protect this great nation of ours at all cost. And many don’t understand that or ever will but every Marine must. I don’t know why Kristen made the comment about many recruits came in ill-mannered or lazy but that is nothing compared to what the DI’s told or called them. Maybe she meant by Marine Boot Camp standards, “they were all equally worthless” in the beginning. Semper Fi Marines!

  12. I am a Marine Mom. I have always been proud of my son, but never as proud as I am of him becoming a Marine. When my son came to me almost 2 years ago and told me he wanted to join I asked him one question: “Why?” He said he wanted to join because it is a brotherhood unlike any of other military branches. From that moment on I have fully supported his decision, never allowing myself to ask the “what if” questions so many parents ask themselves on a regular basis. It hurts me to read that within days of him and his new brothers being recognized as a valuable part of this brotherhood he was called “lazy and ill-mannered” by a fellow Marine. I don’t take this as an insult to my son, who is not and has never been “lazy and ill-mannered.” I am very disappointed for him, though, as I wonder if this brotherhood, the brotherhood he is now staking his life on, is the same brotherhood he has desired for the last 2 years. The fact that this blog was likely preapproved by superiors only furthers my disappointment.

  13. I have greatly enjoyed the Transformation of Marines (TOM) blog and I had come to expect a high degree of professional integrity when visiting the website. The information presented there has consistently shined a very bright light on MCRD San Diego, its military professionals, and its mission of making Marine’s.

    Sgt Whitney Frasier’s posts and photos were exemplary. She was always mindful her audience included parents of the recruits and always tempered her remarks to refer to the recruits with courtesy and respect. Sgt Frasier accurately articulated the dedication and commitment of the Drill Instructor as he worked to transform our young men into basic Marine’s.

    The TOM posting of November 23 was a departure from that level of professionalism and I am very disappointed with pejorative comments made about our Marines before they became Recruits..i.e..”It was probably a very proud day for every parent out there to see that ill-mannered, lazy child of theirs ultimately reborn. I can guarantee they didn’t act the same way as before they shipped for training.”

    While that comment may reflect the Drill Instructors assessment of a very small percentage of the 583 Golf Company Marines who graduated November 18, it is unnecessarily insulting to the parents and brings no honor to the Corps.

    MCRD San Diego recruit training teaches the tenets of professionalism, good order, discipline, and respect for customs and courtesies. The Corps has long recognized the need for continued professional development at each step in a Marines career.

    The Marine professional Officer and NCO corps, their discipline, and respect for customs, courtesies, and traditions are what have made Marines the envy of all military organizations for 236 years. To allow that professional acumen to wane when describing Poolies, Recruits, or basic Marines does not contribute professionally to the Marine legacy and serves to dishonor our Corps.

    We must care to keep Marine honor clean. I expect to see better care taken on future TOM posts.

    V/R
    Larry Massie
    Proud Marine Father

  14. Wow…..Reading this final blog has left me short of speechless…..Kristen, i have a question for you, did you meet my son? ” It was probably a very proud day for every parent out there to see that ill-mannered, lazy child of theirs ultimately reborn. I can guarantee they didn’t act the same way as before they shipped for training.”
    The only part of this that is true is that it was a very proud day…..every word after that is insulting at the very least. Let me tell you about my Son, one of your brothers, a United States Marine….On the morning of September 11, 2001 he sat in the bed with his father, brother and i watching as a plane flew into the World Trade Center….he was 8 years and 7 months old that day and as I cried that very kind, compassionate, well-mannered, well-behaved little boy wiped the tears from my face and said…”Mommy, please don’t cry, when I grow up, i am going to be a Marine and no one will every do this to our country again.” 3 days later, he called me at work and said…”mommy, daddy says it is ok with him if it is ok with you, can I go get a Marine hair cut?”
    From that day on everything he said and did, he did knowing that one day he would be a Marine. He was a fine student ,at the age of 10 he asked for an alarm clock for his birthday and he would set it and get up at 0400, 7 days a week to work out and start his day, he participated in community service projects, 4 years in JROTC serving as the BN Commander his Senior year of high school, started the armed drill team at his high school, proudly marched 4 years in a row in the local Veteran’s Day Parade and EVEN BEFORE he officially became a poolie, he would run from his high school to the Recruit office after school everyday (8 miles one way) just to hang out with and learn more about the Corp from his future BROTHERS…..the very day of his 17th birthday he brought his recruiter to our home so we could sign the necessary papers for the DE program……he knew from the age of 8 what he wanted and he did everything necessary to get where he is today. Every marine has their own reason for deciding to become a Marine and you each have your story…..perhaps you were associated with ill-mannered, lazy children during your time at boot camp and perhaps you did not act the same after boot camp…..but I CAN GUARANTEE YOU…..not all of the young men who arrived at MCRD on August 22, 2011 were ill-mannered, lazy children,. Many of them, including my Son were fine, up-standing YOUNG MEN (hardly children) young men who wanted to be Marines and were willing to do all that was necessary to Earn the title….many of them walked into MCRD as leaders and they walked out as leaders and Marines…..So let me assure you, the young man I sent to MCRD is the young man I got back, still well-mannered, still hard working, still a leader among his peers…..

    At the very least I do think you owe the parents of Golf Company an apology for saying that we raised ill-mannered, lazy children…..let me assure you that ill-mannered, lazy children DO NOT become United States Marines…..if you are not already, one day you may be a Mother and you will come to understand why we are all so passionate, and upset about what you have written.

    And in the future, should you have the opportunity to participate in such a project again, I pray that you will think twice and read three times what you have written, before you post it for all the world to see.

  15. <y son Recruit Lynch, James C is one of the youngest recruits at the depot. He has made our family so proud. After completing high school at the age of 16, he enlisted the day he turned 17yrs old. At age 7 he told us he wanted to be a Marine an he then worked so hard to make that dream come true, He should have graduated Nov 18th but due to a injury he will graduate Dec 21st. They almost released him but my son told them he wanted nothing more than this an if thay could not utilize his body utilize his brain. He now wont be infantry like he had hoped but he will be a Marine. Its been almost 4 mos. and we cant wait to see him, an love knowing he will be home for christmas. As a mother i pray for his safety and that of all the men. Thank You my son for following your dream an giving yourself for the freedom I have. I LOVE YOU!!!

  16. My son Recruit Lynch, James C is one of the youngest recruits at the depot. He has made our family so proud. After completing high school at the age of 16, he enlisted the day he turned 17yrs old. At age 7 he told us he wanted to be a Marine an he then worked so hard to make that dream come true, He should have graduated Nov 18th but due to a injury he will graduate Dec 21st. They almost released him but my son told them he wanted nothing more than this an if thay could not utilize his body utilize his brain. He now wont be infantry like he had hoped but he will be a Marine. Its been almost 4 mos. and we cant wait to see him, an love knowing he will be home for christmas. As a mother i pray for his safety and that of all the men. Thank You my son for following your dream an giving yourself for the freedom I have. I LOVE YOU!!!

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